• OSHA has provided a set of three “Quick Cards” for use in GHS training for employees. They are available in both English and Spanish. They are:

    1. Hazard Communication Safety Data Sheets Training

    This Quick Card lists the 16 sections of a SDS and gives a brief description of 12 of them. The remaining four categories are not described as they cover information required by other agencies and are not enforced by OSHA.

     

    2.GHS Label Training

    This Quick Card provides a sample GHS label and a statement that as of June 1, 2015, all labels will be required to have pictograms, a signal word, hazard and precautionary statements, the product identifier, and supplier identification.

     

    3.HCS Pictograms

    This Quick Card shows the nine pictograms that are used on GHS labels. It shows the pictogram, describes the pictogram with a word or two, and lists the hazards represented by the pictogram.

    1. Hazard Communication Safety Data Sheets Training

    The Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) requires chemical manufacturers, distributors, or importers to provide Safety Data Sheets (SDSs) (formerly known as Material Safety Data Sheets or MSDSs) to communicate the hazards of hazardous chemical products. As of June 1, 2015, the HCS will require new SDSs to be in a uniform format, and include the section numbers, the headings, and associated information under the headings below:

     

    Section 1, Identification includes product identifier; manufacturer or distributor name, address, phone number; emergency phone number; recommended use; restrictions on use.

    Section 2, Hazard(s) identification includes all hazards regarding the chemical; required label elements.

    Section 3, Composition/information on ingredients includes information on chemical ingredients; trade secret claims.

    Section 4, First-aid measures includes important symptoms/ effects, acute, delayed; required treatment.

    Section 5, Fire-fighting measures lists suitable extinguishing techniques, equipment; chemical hazards from fire.

    Section 6, Accidental release measures lists emergency procedures; protective equipment; proper methods of containment and cleanup.

    Section 7, Handling and storage lists precautions for safe handling and storage, including incompatibilities.

    Section 8, Exposure controls/personal protection lists OSHA’s Permissible Exposure Limits (PELs); Threshold Limit Values (TLVs); appropriate engineering controls; personal protective equipment (PPE).

    Section 9, Physical and chemical properties lists the chemical’s characteristics.

    Section 10, Stability and reactivity lists chemical stability and possibility of hazardous reactions.

    Section 11, Toxicological information includes routes of exposure; related symptoms, acute and chronic effects; numerical measures of toxicity.

    Section 12, Ecological information*

    Section 13, Disposal considerations*

    Section 14, Transport information*

    Section 15, Regulatory information*

    Section 16, Other information, includes the date of preparation or last revision.

    *Note: Since other Agencies regulate this information, OSHA will not be enforcing Sections 12 through 15(29 CFR 1910.1200(g)(2)).

    Employers must ensure that SDSs are readily accessible to employees.
    See Appendix D of 1910.1200 for a detailed description of SDS contents.

     

    2. GHS Label Training

     OSHA has updated the requirements for labeliing of hazardous chemicals under its Hazard Communication Standard (HCS). As of June 1, 2015, all labels will be required to have pictograms, a signal word, hazard and precautionary statements, the product identifier, and supplier identification. A sample revised HCS label, identifying the required label elements, is shown below. Supplemental information can also be provided on the label as needed.

    sample-label

     

    3. HCS Pictograms

    As of June 1, 2015, the Hazard Communication Standard (HCS) will require pictograms on labels to alert users of the chemical hazards to which they may be exposed. Each pictogram consists of a symbol on a white background framed within a red border and represents a distinct hazard(s). The pictogram on the label is determined by the chemical hazard classification.hazard-communication

    For more information:

    OSHA Occupational Safety and Health Administration U.S. Department of Labor

    www.osha.gov

    (800) 321-OSHA (6742)

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    This entry was posted on Wednesday, December 3rd, 2014 By admin

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